Poem prompt 8: Aftermath

Today’s poem is the last in our first sequence. Let’s look at endings.

What happened in the time (weeks or years or decades) following your event? What was left? What was changed? What happened next?

Write about the aftermath.

Now imagine two alternate endings and write about those.

Try to fit all three endings into your poem. If three won’t fit–for example, if you’re using a line constraint, you might need to go with two (either the real results and an imagined outcome, or both of your imagined outcomes).

Favorite line

True confessions: Driving and writing in my head can be dicey. I struggled yesterday with my poem’s ending. It wasn’t working, but I was getting ready for a big family dinner at my mother’s house–baking dinner rolls and almond biscuits and peeling carrots and harvesting parsley out in the rain. Okay, that doesn’t sound like a lot, but it left me little time for writing. So I was trying to think up a different way to end the poem while I was driving back (in the dark, in the mist) from dropping my daughter off at school. At one point, I started to get some good ideas–and then I remembered, Hey, I’m driving! (I used to drive and choreograph modern dance in my head–maybe that was even riskier.)

After all that, my new ending still isn’t my favorite line. Here’s the line I’ve chosen from yesterday’s poem:

Call it a miracle or the apocalypse. Gather your horses inside.

Why is a line a favorite? It might not be the strongest line in the poem. In my case, I think I like this one because it has horses in it.

What was your favorite line from the poem you wrote yesterday? Please share it in the comments, so we can all get inspired.

Thanks!

2 Replies to “Poem prompt 8: Aftermath”

  1. Okay, I haven’t started on today’s prompt but I was pretty pleased with my draft from yesterday’s history prompt. I haven’t managed to keep linking the final lines but this historical perspective ended up with me learning about the U.S.S. Missouri and that was very cool. Lines I’m still enjoying: “She has spread more water / than Moses”.

Comments are closed.